Take those animal shot records with you if you travel during the holidays

Traveling with Fido or Fluffy over the holidays?  Make sure you have any pertinent and updated shot records, rabies certifications and licenses with you when you travel, just as if you would have your car insurance, registration and driver's licenses. This will help prevent any hassles with interstate travel, boarding kennels in another state if needed in an emergency, etc.

Officials at First State Animal Center and SPCA say that U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations stipulate that interstate travel with animals may require proof of ownership and health.  Although pets may be staying at Grandma’s/Grandpa’s house, along with two-legged family members, it is important that they are healthy, especially if they are mingling with other household pets. 

While every state has different requirements for dogs, cats and other animal family members crossing state borders, most states require one of two things, if not both: a pet health certificate, and a certificate stating that your pet is current on vaccinations, such as rabies, and the pet is healthy to enter that state. This is especially true if you are adopting an animal from one state and traveling back home to another state. This proactive process will keep sick animals from entering a state.  If it is not possible to get a pet health certificate, then current vaccination records, proof of rabies and animal licenses, should be on hand in the glove department of the car, along with other pertinent automobile information.

A pet health certificate is a document that includes pertinent information about your pet and his or her health, and it would include the pet's name, age, and also if your pet has received recommended vaccinations, is not showing signs of infectious, contagious or communicable disease, and is healthy for travel. Not every state requires you to have a pet health certificate when traveling into that state with your pet, but if they do, chances are they also require that it be signed by your veterinarian and relatively current (often within the past 30 days).

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: we protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and we protect people from animals through our commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Information about the First State Animal Center and SPCA, a non-profit, charitable organization, can be found at www.fsac-spca.org

First State Animal Center and SPCA asks communities to remember Giving Tuesday throughout the Holidays

The First State Animal Center and SPCA celebrates the giving season by reminding its friends and supporters to please honor Giving Tuesdays during the Holiday Season, and to consider contributing to it and other worth-while organizations during the 2014 holidays.

Individuals wishing to give to the state’s largest animal welfare facility may go to its secure giving site online, http://www.fsac-spca.org/donate

If giving in-kind is an interest, donors may check out the FSAC-SPCA Wish List at http://www.fsac-spca.org/wish-list

FSAC-SPCA has also established an account at yougivegoods.com.  Go to: http://yougivegoods.com/dogcatdeshelter. The items can be purchased and sent to the shelter directly.

Thank you for your generosity! - The First State Animal Center and SPCA Team.

Delaware Animal Care and Control Officers promoted at Annual Meeting

Three Delaware Animal Care and Control officers (all Staff Sergeants) were promoted to Lieutenant at the FSAC-SPCA’s recent Annual Meeting.  They received Lieutenant's bars and promotion certificates from board president Alex Moore.

Left to right: Lt. David Hulse, Kent County Division,  Lt. Mary Palacio, Sussex Division, and Lt. Trudy Hollett, New Castle County Division were honored at the meeting.  Alex Moore, board president is to the far right, and Executive Director Kevin Usilton, and DEACC Captain Sherri Warburton are in the back.

 In addition, several DEACC staff received honors at the meeting for exemplary service:

Field Sgt. Kimberly Snares, Michael Ackenbrack, Sandra Galloway, and Andrew Shockley.  New Castle County Field Sergeant Eric Barnes and Corporal Brandon Jarboe were also recognized for their service but were unable to attend.

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Delaware Animal Care and Control is under the auspices of the First State Animal Center – SPCA. Delaware Animal Control is the enforcement agency for Title 3, Title 9 and Title 11 laws pertaining to animal welfare. Title 3 pertains to rabies control; Title 9 pertains to housing and dangerous dogs, and Title 11 pertains to animal cruelty.

Information about the First State Animal Center and SPCA, a non-profit, charitable organization, can be found at www.fsac-spca.org. 

Volunteers and board member honored at First State Animal Center-SPCA’s An Evening for the Animals November 15th

Kent County, DE –Three very special women were recognized at the First State Animal Center and SPCA’s An Evening for the Animals Fundraising event on November 15th.

Elestine Cooper, a volunteer and founding board member of the animal center since it began in the early 1950s, was honored as Outstanding Board Member for 2014. Mrs. Cooper has served in every capacity, from volunteer, board member and board president for more than 60 years. She was one of the founding board members of the Kent County SPCA in the early 1960s.  Mrs. Cooper remains as a board member currently.

Outstanding Board member 2014 Elestine Cooper, flanked by Alex Moore (left), FSAC-SPCA president and Kevin Usilton (right), FSAC-SPCA executive director. 

Sharon Daughtery and Melody Salisbury were also honored as Outstanding Volunteers of 2014. Sharon was noted for her tireless work in nearly every facet of the organization, from cleaning cat kennels, doing laundry, making bed pads for the dogs and cats, stuffing mailings, and helping with adoption events.

Outstanding Volunteers: Melody Salisbury, (left), Sarah Harding, (center) Community Outreach Manager, and Sharon Daughtery

Melody Salisbury has been volunteering with FSAC-SPCA since November of 2013. She works as a groomer for Governors Avenue Animal Hospital. There have been many occasions where Melody has made the difference in an animal’s life by bathing, clipping and brushing them.

The Evening for the Animals raised monies for the care of the animals at the FSAC-SPCA. It was held at the Modern Maturity Center in Dover. Mike Hines and the Look provided the entertainment.

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Donna and Larry Josefowski, long-time supporters of the First State Animal Center and SPCA, at the Evening for the Animals

Carole Kisner and David Litz were the co-chairs of the successful event for the second year in a row. 

Kevin and Angie Phillipson, of Kent County Women’s Journal, enjoyed the evening. Kent County Women’s Journal was the media sponsor of the event. 

Scott and Tamra Baurys, dedicated board member and volunteers for the FSAC-SPCA.

Mavis and Frank Newton have been involved with FSAC-SPCA since the early 1960s, as board members, supporters and volunteers. They were one of the gold sponsors for the Evening for the Animals. 

Just one of many long tables featuring beautiful auction items for An Evening for the Animals.

            Information about the First State Animal Center and SPCA, a non-profit, charitable organization, can be found at www.fsac-spca.org.

First State Animal Center and SPCA saves 206 more cat and dog lives during Challenge; a 30 percent increase over 2013

Kent County, DE – The First State Animal Center and SPCA has completed its entry into the ASPCA Rachael Ray $100K Challenge, and the bottom line is that at least 30 percent more cat and dog lives were saved during the summer of 2014 over the summer of 2013.

These numbers were released to the Challengers on October 7. FSAC-SPCA came in fifth (out of 10 places) in their Division 4, and 28th place overall, out of 50 Challengers nationwide.

 Overall, nationally, 68,805 cats and dogs were saved through strays returned to owners and adoptions, a 16,789 increase over last summer’s Challenge results.

"Our official numbers show that we saved 922 cat and dog lives through adoptions and strays returned to their lost and worried owners," said J. Kevin Usilton, Executive Director of the FSAC-SPCA. "Last summer, we saved 717 cat and dog lives through adoptions and strays returned to owners. Our increase is about 30 percent and we are very thrilled with our new life saving partnerships," Usilton said.

Usilton said that the number of cat and dog transfers to other rescue organizations were about the same, 57 during the summer of 2014 versus 56 during summer of 2013.

"The most important aspects about being a part of this great Challenge were that we saved many more lives through adoptions and RTOs, and our staff came together and worked very well as a solidified, enthusiastic team," he said. "We had adoption events all over the state - we were in Wilmington and the beach area at least once a week with adoptable cats and dogs.  It really helped to get our name out there and tell people about the important work we do here i­­­n Delaware. The FSAC-SPCA staff - everyone - including the Delaware Animal Care and Control officers, gave it their all to make sure they were doing the best they humanly could do to work with the public and save innocent animal lives through the adoption, RTOs and transfer processes."

Waiving the adoption fee for adult cats and dogs during the month of August was a huge boost to the Animal Center's efforts, especially with dog adoptions. Last summer, the FSAC-SPCA adopted out 89 dogs; the summer of 2014, the center adopted out 181 dogs. Cat adoptions remained about the same - 64 cats adopted this summer versus 60 cats last summer. "It saddens me that more people aren't cat people," Usilton said, adding that the public really should take advantage of the low-cost cat spay/neuter clinics that the FSAC-SPCA and the other animal humane facilities will occasionally offer, to impact the stray cat population in the state, which leads to overwhelming numbers of homeless cats and feral cat colonies.

The animal welfare and adoption facility applied in January to be a part of the competition, and was accepted, along with 49 other shelters across the United States, through a highly competitive process.  FSAC-SPCA was in one of the highest levels - Level 4, based on its high intake numbers, and it was competing against shelters residing in cities whose populations were greater than the state of Delaware as a whole.

"We are continuing to look at ways to improve the adoption process, and to make the shelter as comfortable as it can be for both the animals who are awaiting their forever homes, and for the families and individuals who hope to find that perfect companion," Usilton said. "If you are interested in joining us in our life saving work, we will be happy to discuss the program details with you, your business, or social group." 

More information can be found about the Challenge and the results at:

http://challenge.aspcapro.org/

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Annual “Puppies in the Pool” Friend-and-Fund-raiser at Killens Pond State Park, Saturday, September 6, 12 – 2 p.m.

August 27, 2014, Kent County, DE – Killens Pond State Park and First State Animal Center and SPCA are teaming up to sponsor the fun, family-oriented, “Puppies in the Pool,” friend-and-fund-raiser, Saturday, September 6, 2014, from 12 p.m. until 2 p.m.

Dogs and their owners are invited for this annual, end-of-season swim at Killens Pond State Park. “Puppies in the Pool” is an annual event sponsored by the park and the First State Animal Center and SPCA.

 Admission fees are the following: park entrance fee of $3 per car and waterpark fee of $7 per dog and owner. Additional owners are $3 each. Leashes, current vaccinations and license required for each dog. Dogs from the FSAC-SPCA will be available for adoption. For further information, call (302) 284-4526, or destateparks.com

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

          Information about the First State Animal Center and SPCA, a non-profit, charitable organization, can be found at www.fsac-spca.org. 

Adoption Fees Waived for the Month of August

First State Animal Center-SPCA waives adoption fees for adult cats and dogs only for the month of August; shelter is above capacity for animals

For the month of August 2014, adoption fees for adult cats and dogs only and more than 6 months of age are being waived, due to overcrowding and to help the Animal Center with its ASPCA Adoption Challenge, which ends August 31, 2014 at midnight. Adoption hold fees of $20 are also waived. This special applies to the main Camden shelter, PetSmart in North Dover, and all adoption events.  This applies only while the center has available animals for adoption, and only for the month of August 2014.

“We work diligently to comply with the unfunded mandates expected of us, one of those with the biggest impact is accepting all homeless cats and dogs that we have room for,” said J. Kevin Usilton, Executive Director. “This has brought us to a place where we have more animals than we really have space for, so we’ve decided to waive the adoption fees just for the month of August for our adoptable animals.” Currently, the FSAC-SPCA has 130 available animals for adoption, including 71 cats, 60 dogs, two rabbits, a hamster, and a small pony. The center is holding more than 200 animals waiting for either adoption, return to lost owner, or euthanasia.  

The First State Animal Center and SPCA is part of the ASPCA Rachel Ray Adoption Challenge, which runs from June 1st through August 31st.  As of July 15th, the FSAC-SPCA was in 35th place out of 50, and 6th place (out of ten) in its division.

 “We would like to win this competition, which will bring much needed resources to our State's homeless animals,” added Usilton.

Usilton said that many participating animal shelters in the Challenge have waived their adoption fees during a timeframe to help adopt out the animals in their care, so this can be a normal practice. “Also, we are firm believers that an animal will do much better in the care of a loving home and family, instead of spending its life in shelter, regardless of how well the animal center cares for it,” he said, noting that the animals are extremely well cared for at FSAC-SPCA. Usilton noted that all potential adoptive families and individuals will still have to qualify for the adoption and go through the adoption screening and be prepared to wait in line possibly.  The adoption fee waiver will be in effect until the end of August, or until all adoptable animals are adopted, whichever comes first.

Lisa Strong Chase, director of development and marketing for the FSAC-SPCA, says this is an extremely generous move on the Center’s part. “Every adoptable animal that is placed on the adoption list is vaccinated, spayed or neutered and microchipped, which costs us about $150 per animal,” she said. “That doesn’t include the board and food costs. Our fund-raising appeals quote $1,000 can cover the cost of a dog’s stay in the kennel, from the intake date to the adoption date – if the dog is in for a few months. For a cat, it is $500. This will help us hopefully find wonderful forever homes for the animals in our care. I think it is also a gift to the community, which has been so supportive of our efforts.”

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Delaware Animal Care and Control is under the auspices of the First State Animal Center – SPCA. Delaware Animal Control is the enforcement agency for Title 3, Title 9 and Title 11 laws pertaining to animal welfare. Title 3 pertains to rabies control; Title 9 pertains to housing and dangerous dogs, and Title 11 pertains to animal cruelty.

Keeping your pets cool in the heat

Tips for keeping your pet cool in the summer

Contact: Lisa Chase, (302) 943-6032, ext. 123, l.chase@fsac-spca.org

The hot summer days of summer are upon us, and that means taking care of ourselves – and our pets. It is important for pet owners to ensure their animals’ comfort and wel-being in the heat of the summer; animals are especially at risk for heat stroke and other complications from the heat.

Lisa Strong Chase, Director of Development and Public Relations for the First State Animal Center and SPCA, urged pet owners to never leave their pet in a parked car – not even for a minute. “On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes,” she said. “After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. The pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die.” She adds that keeping the engine running with the air conditioning on for a few moments is also dangerous for the animal, and harmful to the environment. Chase recommended that the pet be kept at home inside, or in an enclosed yard with shade and access to plenty of fresh, cool water. “As much as many dogs love to ride in the car with their owners, hot summer days are not appropriate for car rides around town, unless you are going to the veterinarian for a scheduled appointment,” she says.

 Chase said that bystanders can help a pet left in a hot car by doing the following:

1)    Take down the car's make, model and license-plate number.
2)        If there are businesses nearby, notify their managers or security guards and ask them to make an announcement to find the car's owner.
3)    If the owner can't be found, call the non-emergency number of the local police or animal control and wait by the car for them to arrive. Delaware Animal Care and Control can be reached 24 hours a day/ 7 days a week at 698-3006, option 1.

Chase says that pet owners must also watch the humidity, not just the temperature. High humidity can cause serious problems for a pet. For instance, a dog’s temperature should never be above 104 degrees; if it is from being outside, try to lower the dog’s temperature by adding cool towels around the dog and call their veterinarian. It doesn’t take long for heart stroke to set in.

Limit exercise on hot days; go for walks in the early morning and at night when the temperatures are lower.

Cats, innately intelligent creatures, will find the coolest places in the house, such as the porcelain sink and tub. Keeping their coats clean and tangle free will also keep them cooler.

Provide ample shade and clear, cool water if the pet must remain outside.  (Cool, clear water is important for inside too.) Add ice to the pet’s water to keep it cool. A dog house, while it is important to have if the pet is outside, does not always provide ample protection from the heat – in fact, it can make the risk worse as it is an enclosed small structure with not much escape for hot air and not enough ventilation. The dog house structure must be in a shaded area if being used.  Also, dogs can get sunburned.

Let the dog lie in a dog or baby pool in cool water to keep body temperature down in scorching temperatures.

Extreme temperatures can cause heatstroke. Some signs of heatstroke are heavy panting, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness.

Animals are at particular risk for heat stroke if they are very old, very young, and overweight, not conditioned to prolonged exercise, or have heart or respiratory disease. Some breeds of dogs—like boxers, pugs, bull dogs, shih tzus, and other dogs and cats with short muzzles—will have a much harder time breathing in extreme heat.

Chase recommends that if citizens find animals trapped inside cars or if they find pets languishing in the heat without appropriate shade and water, to please Delaware Animal Care and Control at (302) 698-3006, option 1, for guidance. She encouraged anyone who may know of situations involving animal cruelty or other animal neglect to contact DEACC at (302) 698-3006, option 1.

 Delaware Animal Care and Control is under the auspices of the First State Animal Center – SPCA. Delaware Animal Control is the enforcement agency for Title 3, Title 9 and Title 11 laws pertaining to animal welfare. Title 3 pertains to rabies control; Title 9 pertains to housing and dangerous dogs, and Title 11 pertains to animal cruelty.

 The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Foster family needed for pitbull brutally attacked

Foster family needed for pitbull brutally attacked and injured in Wilmington by unknown persons; DEACC responds to call and transports animal to local animal hospital

May 21, 2014, Kent County, DE – Delaware Animal Care and Control is in possession of a pit bull who was taken out of his yard in Wilmington, and nearly beaten to death by unknown persons on May 19, 2014.

Captain Sherri Warburton, head of Delaware Animal Care and Control, reported that the dog’s owner called DEACC, who responded to the scene of the attack. The dog was transported to Vet Specialty in New Castle  where he was found to have three fractures and may have lost his eye sight due to the attack.

“The distraught owner signed him over to us as he could not afford the vet bills,” Captain Warburton said. “He is in need of a quiet foster home where he can rest; the animal shelter environment can be noisy at times, and he needs a quiet place where he can heal and receive some TLC.” 

The vet who administered medical treatment to "Oden" said he is a very sweet dog and has pulled through this trauma like a champ,” she said. The dog will be released today by the animal hospital and taken to the First State Animal Center and SPCA’s main facility in Camden.

Captain Warburton said that the investigation is still ongoing at this time. Anyone who might have some information about this case or who may have witnessed it is asked to call DEACC at 302 698-3006, option 1.

The incident occurred in an alley behind East 17th Street in Wilmington. DEACC is asking anyone with surveillance cameras in the area to please contact them.  

Delaware Animal Care and Control is under the auspices of the First State Animal Center – SPCA. Delaware Animal Control is the enforcement agency for Title 3, Title 9 and Title 11 laws pertaining to animal welfare. Title 3 pertains to rabies control; Title 9 pertains to housing and dangerous dogs, and Title 11 pertains to animal cruelty.

 

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Information about the First State Animal Center and SPCA, a non-profit, charitable organization, can be found at www.fsac-spca.org.

First State Animal Center and SPCA holding Vaccination Clinic, Monday, May 19, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. and a CAT Spay/Neuter Clinic

The First State Animal Center-SPCA will hold its next vaccination clinic on Monday, May 19th, from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. There is also a Fixin’ To Save Lives Spay/Neuter Clinic for cats only scheduled from 10:30 a.m. until 5 p.m.  on Monday. The vaccination clinic is first-come, first-serve; the spay/neuter clinic is by appointment.

Rabies, distemper and bordatella are $15 each, microchipping is $25. Bring prior vaccine history for each animal to receive a 3- year rabies vaccine. The clinic will be held in the holding bay, the large tan warehouse at Animal Control, next door to the FSAC-SPCA, located on Cochran Drive, Camden, DE.

The Spay/Neuter is as follows: $55 for males, $75 for females. This also includes a rabies shot. You may call 943-6032, ext. 2, to schedule the appointment.

Regarding the vaccination clinic, please have your pets’ paperwork with you to determine the best vaccine schedule for your pet. We do not give vaccines to pets under 8 weeks old. The rabies vaccine will not be given to animals under 16 weeks old.

Please note the following price schedule for New Vectra (for flea & tick):

Cat - $43.00
Dog 2-20 lb - $47.00
Dog 21-55 lb - $48.00
Dog 56-95 lb - $50.00
Dog over 95 lb - $51.00

At the vaccination clinic, all dogs must be on a leash and all cats must be in a carrier. Aggressive dogs must stay in the vehicle but may have to wait to be vaccinated. Individuals and families are responsible for their pets; bring water, waste bags and a muzzle if needed. We accept cash, checks and Visa/MC. Parking is in our fenced lot beside the tan building or in front. There is NO PARKING on the street. Please dress appropriately and keep your pets safe. No appointments are taken – it is first-come, first-serve.

The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Pit Bulls involved in attack euthanized

Three Pit bulls involved in mortally wounding four-year-old Felton boy have been euthanized; their remains have been sent for rabies testing

Contact:  Lisa S. Chase, (302) 943-6032, ext. 123, l.chase@fsac-spca.org, or Captain Sherri Warburton, (302) 698-3006, option 1

May 8, 2014, Kent County, DE – Delaware Animal Care and Control is in possession of three pit bull canines that are responsible for mortally wounding a four-year old boy in Felton, DE, on the afternoon of May 7, 2014.  The dogs have been euthanized, and their remains will be sent for further rabies testing.

Captain Sherri Warburton, head of Delaware Animal Care and Control, reported that the dogs were unvaccinated, and they were not spayed or neutered.

The incident occurred Wednesday afternoon around 4 p.m. on the 900 block of Edwardsville Road. Delaware State Police say the 4-year-old boy and his pregnant mother were visiting a family friend at the time. The child was in the yard playing with the friend's three pit bulls, whom he had been around several times in the past.

When the child’s mother looked out the window to check on him, she says she saw the dogs attacking her son. While her friend called 911, she ran out in an attempt to save her son, sustaining numerous bites on both arms.  Two HVAC repairmen working at the house at the time also attempted to save the young child by fending off the animals with PVC piping.

EMS, troopers and Delaware Animal Care and Control (DEACC) Officers responded to the scene; DEACC took immediate possession of the animals, which were placed in the home’s garage. EMS began first aid on the young boy, but he was soon pronounced dead.  His body was turned over the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner who will conduct an autopsy to rule the exact cause and manner of death.

The boy's pregnant mother was transported to Kent General Hospital where she is being treated for her injuries as well as observation.

Delaware Animal Care and Control is under the auspices of the First State Animal Center – SPCA. Delaware Animal Control is the enforcement agency for Title 3, Title 9 and Title 11 laws pertaining to animal welfare. Title 3 pertains to rabies control; Title 9 pertains to housing and dangerous dogs, and Title 11 pertains to animal cruelty.

 The mission of the First State Animal Center and SPCA is twofold: they protect animals from people, by prevention of cruelty and suffering, rescue of the trapped or injured, emergency medical treatment, temporary housing for homeless animals and the reduction of homeless pet overpopulation through targeted spay/neuter and education programs; and they protect people from animals through their commitment  in placing only stable, safe and well-adjusted animals into homes where they will thrive while simultaneously educating the public about responsible pet guardianship.

Information about the First State Animal Center and SPCA, a non-profit, charitable organization, can be found at www.fsac-spca.org